monica's blog

What is Junk Food according to Ayurveda?

Manjulali

When it comes to carrying the burden of junk food- fast food joints and their plethora of calorie laden, nutrition free offerings like Burgers, pizzas, doughnuts and sodas usually come to mind. And, no doubt they are definitely the major culprits and villains in making our diet stripped of any nutrients.

However, Ayurveda assumes the following will harm the person, hence is 'junk' to their dhatus (bodily tissues), doshas (natural constitution) and agni (digestive fire) that we tend to overlook.

And, lets remember not all organic foods are created equal. Once processed for shelf life, they are being given the same treatment as conventionally grown food.

Dont get me wrong, we all do this. I have bought frozen organic dinners for my son many times. However, doesnt mean it is a great, and, top healthy choice. It is better than non organic frozen dinner, but, still has no prana. Here is why:

1. Organic, or, non organic foods that has been tinned in a BPA lining can is toxic. Yes, even if it is organic may be considered contaminated from Ayurvedic sense. Body will spend more time detoxifying you, then, absorbing nutrients.

2. Organic or non organic foods that have been over processed, and, many chemical additives have been added. Ayurveda does not believe that allergies just manifest out of thin air. Eating over-processed foods eventually weakens our Annavaha srotas, Purishavaha srotas. (Upper and lower GI Tract), reduces the gut bacteria, and, sensitizes us to the point of allergy.

3. Cooked food that has been frozen for a long time. (Including organic). Yes, there are nutrients present in this. However, no prana. Prana is the key ingredient.

4. Most conventionally grown vegetables and fruits that have been sprayed with heavy duty pesticides, or, grown in soil with heavy duty pesticides are carrying that poison of pesticide in their very being. Yes, we cant afford organic all the time. But, its good to understand that conventionally grown food maybe carrying a lot of harmful substances, that may lead to AMA (toxins).

There was a study being quoted on the Internet a while ago, how actually conventionally grown food is BETTER than organic-because the pesticides allow it to reach full peak. And, study said no difference in nutrition was found, except pesticides. I have had people arguing with me at dinner parties quoting this study over and over again.

Conventionally grown food may be nutrition, but, it is also rich in trace amounts of pesticides that may be linked to cancer, and, may lead to many diseases. Such food has no Prana, or, Chi in the food. Only nutrition.

Even from the perspective of taste or Rasa, conventionally grown food may have nutrition, but has less taste, and, definitely is lacking prana.

I have given this example of a dead squirrel that got buried in snow entire winter. When summer came around, its body was preserved. So, were the nutrients. However, there was no prana or life in this squirrel. This was a dead body of the poor creature.

Conventionally grown food that has been frozen, canned, tinned---is food that has died. It is dead. It has no prana from an Ayurvedic perspective.

Now, if you have ever bought an organic bread, or food--you will see that they decompose FASTER. That's the whole point. This is why the whole food industry adds a million additives--to preserve shelf life.

Yes, if my clients have no choice but to eat such foods due to lifestyle, price, and convenience factors--I ask them to at least eat ONE fresh local organic food item a day. I ask them to mix fresh spices, and, herbs in their frozen dinner.

Is Ayurveda going mainstream like Yoga?

Jane Henry
Student-Blog by Block 1 Track B Student

Ayurveda is becoming more recognized in the United States, but it will not experience the same mainstream popularity that Yoga has experienced.

1. Yoga is big business.

Yoga has experienced mainstream success thanks to the commercialization of it. From busy city corners to quiet main streets, Yoga studios have popped up all over. Yoga mats can be found from stores like Whole Foods to TJMaxx. Yoga clothing maintained popularity with the fashion trend, Athleisure. Yoga is lucrative. A hashtag search on Instagram shows #Yoga with 23,865,442 tags. #Ayurveda has 244,359 tags.

In order for Ayurveda to experience mainstream success, it needs to be incorporated into business models that are both profitable and scalable.

2. Ayurveda is complex.

Without a trusted practitioner or expert of Ayurveda guiding the way, navigating Ayurveda as a novice is confusing.

Information online is copious. It is difficult to wade through the sea of website documentation, while verifying authenticity and understanding enough of the subject matter in order to confidently apply it to one’s own medical condition. Medical-related inquires and online search do not yield helpful results.

On Twitter, Comedian Bill Murray said it best.

Me: “My elbow hurts.”

Doctor website: “Elbow cancer.”

Ayurvedic herbs or beauty rituals may experience short term popularity because they are easy to understand and to apply to one’s lifestyle, but the importance of Ayurveda as a holistic health modality is much more multifaceted.

3. Western Medicine vs. Ayurveda

If western medicine were to challenge Ayurveda to a boxing match, western medicine would deliver a knockout punch in the first round. The public trusts western medicine’s ability to deliver immediate results. Side effects of “get-healed- fast” are downplayed or prescribed with additional pills. Deepak Chopra and others have taken great steps in communicating the health benefits of Ayurveda in the US, but only the tip of this iceberg is showing.

There is a seismic shift toward whole body health with more focus on traditional ways of healing in the US. NAMA (The National Ayurvedic Medical Association) is focused on enforcing stricter regulations for those who wish to practice Ayurveda, with board examinations and license examination beginning December 1st, 2016.

While Ayurveda will not experience the same mainstream popularity that Yoga has experienced, I believe Ayurveda will enjoy a slow and thoughtful growth, where the ancient wisdom of Ayurveda is respected, learned, shared, and practiced in today’s modern world.

References:

Instagram Hashtag Search, 08/08/16

Use of milk (dairy) in Ayurvedic Medicine

Manjulali

In the last decade, especially with studies on casein, and, many people developing sensitivity to Lactose, a sugar found within milk, or, problems digesting milk proteins; milk has developed a bad reputation in United States.

I get asked constantly in my Herb class, if Almond milk, or, soymilk is okay to substitute for dairy when using as an anupana for delivery of herb. The answer is NO. It is not the Ayurvedic way.

When I am talking about using milk as an anupana (a vehicle that increases the efficacy of the herb, and, delivers it deeper into the dhatus, increases kapha, decreases vata and pitta) then only actual dairy will do. This usually means cows milk.

First the amount of milk we are using for delivery of herb is 24 ml, or less than an oz. Perhaps 2 oz. If someone cannot digest dairy, then we suggest ghee instead. (All milk solids which include casein and lactose have been removed!)

By the way, how can a nut milk be milk? By definition, a milk is produced from a mammary gland? And, if god didn't attend humans to drink milk then he/she wouldn't have provided those to the feminine gender, I think!

Ayurvedic texts like Bhavaprakasha mention benefits of milk not just from cows, but, also from sheep, camel, buffalo and goat to name a few.

Another question I get constantly asked is do we like milk raw or boiled?

Answer is boiled. Pasteurized. But--how??? Ayurveda is all natural? How can it not advocate raw milk. Because, my dear, raw milk can give rise to diseases. It can carry DANGEROUS bacteria.

Ayurveda does not like bacteria and krimi. Our ancient seers talked about boiling milk when everyone had a cow in their backyard, everyday and once a day.

In ancient times, we got rid of bacteria, and, all kinds of krimi by constantly boiling our water, milk, and, all fluids.

I grew up in our household boiling our milk every single day, sometimes twice a day (If it was too hot, as we didnt have refrigeration).

First lets understand what is the difference between different types of pasteurizing and boiling?

Batch pasteurization-Milk is heated to 155 degrees Fahrenheit for half an hour. (Stirring constantly is a must. We grew up getting up early in the morning to get to the cowshed and getting milk directly from the cow dairy in Delhi. Then, we would come home and we would boil the milk,and, as soon as it reached boiling point, we would turn the flame down and boil it further for another 10-15 minutes. I had to stir it, and, stir it, and, stir it. Okay in Ayurveda, in my opinion.)

Flash pasteurization- High temperature 162 Fahrenheit for 15 seconds. Okay in Ayurveda, in my humble opinion.

UHT (Ultra Heat) -Milk is heated to 280 degrees-and every good thing about it is pretty much destroyed along with the bacteria
Not okay!

(http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/cellular-microscopic/pasteurizatio...)

Boiling the milk for some seconds is advised in Ayurveda. Just not ultra pasteurized.

We boil herbs like Ashwagandha in milk. We add turmeric or poppy seeds, or nutmeg to this boiled milk. We add saffron.

We drink it with herbs.

We even boil water that is already sterile in Ayurveda. Boiling water causes the agni, or, fire element to be present and changes the energetics of the water to a lighter and easily digestible.

Local, Grass fed organic milk pasteurized milk is the best I found in California, and, now in Austin.

HOMOGENIZED MILK

What Ayurveda doesn't like is when the chemical structure of the milk is changed by homogenizing it. Homogenezing involves playing with the chemical molecular structure of fat particles in milk that rise up. (We called it cream growing up!)

And, these fat particles are broken up so they mix with the rest of the milk - so no cream would be formed.

Ultra pasteurized means it is first pasteruized, then pasteurized again to make it ultra sterile and that kills off the nutrients. Then, Vitamin D (Read Fish oil) are added.

This is why we use this milk from California that is lightly pasteurized, you see the cream floating on the top and it has not been altered by changing chemical structure.

Next, I shall write about goat milk

Ayurveda courses and certifications online

One of the questions we get asked a lot, is how can Ayurveda colleges offer Ayurvedic Medicine certifications online, or, via distant learning? Does this mean our Ayurvedic Studies will not be interactive?

How shall we learn under a qualified Ayurvedic Practitioner online? How will we learn nadi pariksha? How do we achieve this?

If you want direct information about our courses, scroll down, or, CLICK HERE FOR COURSE INFORMATION

First of all, not all our courses are 100% online. For example, our NAMA (National Ayurvedic Medical Association) reviewed Ayurvedic Counselor Program is not 100% online. It is offered as a hybrid training delivery. Courses are offered both online, via interactive REAL TIME classes, Onsite classes, and, through interactive forum discussions, and pre recorded lectures. So, the program has the following aspects:

a) Online Webex sessions-

Live lectures that students can attend from their mobile android, or apple device. Or, through their computer. These sessions may be recorded, and, are available to watch on a computer for one week. Screenshot attached.

b) Interactive Forum Discussion-

After a lecture, teachers will usually ask the students to start a forum discussion on certain topics on our online learning system we call WORKSPACE.

Students login and post forum discussions, read discussions from other students. Forum posts follow certain rules--and are on specific topics. This is all done at an OFFLINE time at the workspace.

Screenshot of a forum discussion shown here.

c) Onsite Workshops- Every few months there are workshops in Austin Tx than can be four hours in length to four days in length. Shorter study programs, lectures may be offerred at San Diego, CA, Oakland, CA, Houston TX, Dallas, TX and Tampa, FL provided we have at least four students confirmed.

Many onsite workshops have dedicated time, where, students learn directly under Ayurvedic Practitioner. This includes Ayurvedic Cooking Demonstrations, learning how to prepare Ayurvedic Herb mixes, and, learning nadi or pulse pariksha.

Here is a video of an onsite workshop:

d) Online Workspace-

Workspace Login

A message board, workspace, learning management system, forum and discussion center-our online workspace offers all that and more. Students will be able to take their final tests online. (Computer Adaptive Method, and, Summative Method in order to prepare them from national testing for Ayurveda Counselors beginning from December 1st. Our current students will be able to start taking some online tests from September onwards)

e)Distant learning or home learning- All the student readings, student homework pertaining to research, memorizing, and, learning is considered home learning or distant learning. All the time spent on workspace downloading, going through material is also distant learning.

Our Ayurveda college curriculum has been designed by professional instructional designer with focus on all three learners:

1. Visual Learners- Visuals, DVD, Archived Youtube videos, Charts, Powerpoint Presentations online and Study Aids used for Visual Learners online, and, sent to the student while pursuing their Ayurvedic Studies.

2. Auditory Learners- Those who like to listen, you will hear, and, get a chance to ask questions at our live virtual classes. Many Pre recorded lectures available on youtube and at our workspace.

3. Hands on learners- Come to the workshop onsite and you will get plenty of Hands on experience.

Thank you!

Cooking for your own Dosha

Ayurvedic Nutrition is easy and simple, yet, quite complicated.

Unless you are well, and, quite healty, it is not possible to just read a book and start using recipes indicated for your dosha-Vata, Pitta or Kapha.

For those who are unwell, suffering from vitiated agni (digestive fire), or other dosha related imbalances, it is advised you visit an Ayurvedic Practitioner.

Ayurvedic Nutrition considers the following items:

Rasa-There are six tastes. Ones food and diet must have all the six tastes when one is well. When unwell, it is suggested to focus on the rasas, or, tastes suggested for your dosha. For example, for pitta and high heat sweet (naturally), bitter and astringent (green beans, plantain) are suggested.

Virya-Heating or Cooling Potency

Protein Source<-Animal based, Plant Based (always preferred)

Sattva, Tamas, or Rajas-Affect on the mind.

Prana- Local, organic and full of Prana

Ojas- If the food item supports ojas or bodys natural immunity.



Image: Michael Puma, Ayurvedic Counselor Student

San Diego College of Ayurveda offers online courses in Ayurvedic Nutrition, Ayurveda Counselor and Yoga Teacher Training.

Contact Us

Challenges and Best Practices of Ayurveda in USA

Stacy Gonzales

Ayurveda is a 5000-year-old science and throughout the course of time there has been little or no change in the practiced form.

While it can be said the overall principles of Ayurveda is timeless; the reality is that today’s society demands modern treatments which combine both science and technology to not only assess and understand the body, but to treat diseases as well. As scientists continue to discover and analyze diseases, modern technology allows them to determine the root cause down to the DNA level.

In turn, this allows the research and development of modern drugs to also be done at the molecular level. This allows for a very comprehensive and dynamic understanding of cause and effect of pharmaceuticals on the body as well as the disease. Unfortunately, while this may be beneficial in the treatment and cure of some diseases, from an Ayurvedic perspective, it does not take into consideration the concept of the fundamental principles.

If the fundamental principles were proactively considered as function for optimal health and maintaining the balance and harmony of the tridoshas, disease may be prevented altogether. While technology does offer some benefits, it is not without its faults.

Just as technology creates opportunity for cures, it also fabricates new disorders. A primary example would be diseases resulting from GMOs. Food that has been genetically altered at the gene level is not compatible with the body at the genetic and cellular level thus resulting in new disorders.

It can then be argued that Ayurveda, while “old-fashioned” in nature is based on clean, organic foods that the body can naturally metabolize as intended via the fundamental principles.

Without dramatic lifestyle changes, a few Ayurvedic best practices -example DAILY ROUTINE PRACTICES can help improve overall health. In fact, while at the root of Ayurvedia, many of these are well known best practices that are suggested time and time again.

These are some of the DAILY ROUTINE RULES:

 Eat your largest meal midday. This is when Agni is at its peak.
 Choose whole foods and make sure your meals have a rainbow of colors. This variety of colors will help ensure you use the six tastes in every meal and lead to overall satisfaction.
 Don’t eat while overly emotional. This can lead to poor diet choices as well as poor digestion.
 Take the time to enjoy your meal. As you chew, digestive enzymes are produced by your salivary glands that assist in breaking down your food
 Practice mindful meditation. This includes anything from breath awareness to yoga as it helps to reduce cortisol levels which relates to a reduction in stress and weight gain both which if not kept at bay results in illness. A little you time never hurt anyone.
 Get enough sleep. This is when the body repairs and heals itself and the mind and emotions become balanced.
Simple practices that yield a lifetime of benefits.

Ayurveda in United States

Allyson St Amand
Scott Ostriker

(Track B Student Submissions)

    Roots

Despite the 5000+ year roots of Ayurveda in ancient religious traditions of India, the interest in this holistic medicine did not expand in the United States until the 1970’s. Adoption of Ayurveda in the United States has been slow going due to the differences in holistic versus allopathic medicine approaches. As a result, traditional western medicine has contrasted with Ayurvedic beliefs linked to treating the being at multiple levels, not solely the physical body. In the United States, the mind and spirit are missing from approach to treating illness and disease.

    Challenges

Over the past 40 years, adoption of Ayurveda in the United States has been faced with challenges. The present challenges of Ayurveda include globalization and industrialization of drugs, and the quality assurance in the use of drugs. Traces of lead, mercury and arsenic have been found in over-the-counter medicine manufactured in South Asia (Ref: National Institute for Ayurvedic Medicine.) In addition, it is believed further research, testing and validation is needed to expand upon the Pramana Vijnan Ayurvedic principles and philosophies.

The World Health Organization has studied the uses of Ayurveda and herbal medicine in India. Due to regulatory challenges, the WHO has suggested a plan for countries to standardize national traditional medicine polies and programs.

Although Ayurveda is faced with some challenges, there is billions of American’s spending money on alternative medical treatments. The emphasis on holistic medicine is increasing as side effects and outcomes of allopathic medicine become understood. A shift away from treating the disease to preventative and pre-symptoms are now being taken into account. Spirituality, beliefs, values, diet and lifestyle are all very important components of health and well-being. Best practices of Ayurvedic medicines include sophisticated therapeutic formulations and detailed guidance about food/nutrition/diet (EPMA, 2014).

In addition, the Ayurvedic physician offers personalized medicine to maximize the therapeutic efficacy and safety of persons with their disorder, specified condition according to their constitution, and properties of materials (EPMA, 2014). Ayurveda is non-invasive and

Although the present challenges to adoption of Ayurveda has impacted the speed of adoption, I believe the growing need for Ayurveda as a healthcare approach which incorporates religious and spiritual demands, will force scientists and healthcare professionals to study and practice Ayurveda. Patients are becoming more informed about the medical approaches available to them. As a result, this will only continue to reinforce the best practices and benefits of Ayurveda.

    Best Practices

Scott Ostriker

I am choosing to discuss challenges and best practices in Ayurveda in the US. I have to admit that i am very much a student of the discipline and am not sure if best practices have been defined. I know in western medicine, the term best practice is often used rather loosely as their can be differing opinions on what "best practice" actually is. Sometimes, there are evidence based or consensus based recommendations from experts in that niche area.

This gives us something to work with but even these become outdated rapidly and will sometimes conflict with other guidelines/recommendations. I am not aware that there are any specialty groups within Ayurveda than can offer these evidence based or consensus based guidelines or "best practices" at this point. (Here is where i am fine with being corrected as we will all learn from this if there is something i don't know out here...)

I think that one of the greatest challenges is that Ayurveda it does not benefit any special interest groups or organizations. Because of this, there will always be limited funds to conduct intense scientific based research which is often needed to be recognized in this country. As we all know, there is research funded by the government and public organizations but much of the research being done is still funded by the pharmaceutical industry.

Of course, if Ayurveda can prove that integrating its use can decrease morbidity and cost insurance companies less money, there is a chance it may be recognized and paid for. These may be recognized by Accountable Care Organizations as well if Ayurveda can prove that integrating this practice into the lives of the population cared for can decrease hospitalizations and overall costs.

With a focus on true wellness, this may be a possibility but we have to recognize that many will not be open to this discipline anytime soon so we will need to focus on improving the outcomes of those who are. Until this is recognized by Medicare, Medicaid, and private payers, Ayurveda will need to focus on those willing to go outside of their insurance company.

Ayurvedic Nutrition Label

Western Nutrition label focuses on Carbohydrates, Proteins, Fats, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Iron, number of calories etc.

Dr Monica Groover and a student who was a registered dietician thought of a fun way to actually explain Ayurvedic Ahara (nutrition) to students by asking them to illustrate what they thought an Ayurvedic Nutrition Label would look like.

Here is a great example by Surekha Koya, Block 2 counselor student.


Organic, or, local-GMo or NON GMO--Ayurvedic Perspective



By Monica B Groover

Today we will talk about organic, local foods.

Ayurveda propogates fresh, local and Organic, plus, it should be compatible with the dosha, the season, the country and terrain we live in and our age and strength. Whew!

Its a long list. How can we hope to remember this.

Lets just focus on Prana in the Food.

Prana is the vitality of the food.

One of my students asked me recently, "My question pertains to fruit that is organic, from a local farm, picked at the height of ripeness, but then frozen (but without any additives or preservatives).

In the West, I have often heard that frozen fruits and vegetables can be more nutritious than fresh, because they are picked when they are ripe, and then flash frozen which retains most of the nutrients."


Image: Wikipedia. Creative Commons by Erdbeere_Senga_Sengana

My student asked this question after our class, in which we talk about frozen food being depleted of prana.

So, I answered leading with the Ayurvedic concept of Rasa. There are shad rasa or six tastes mentioned in Ayurvedic Texts. (Naturally sweet, sour, naturally salty, bitter, astringent and pungent--a topic for later study!)

How does a fresh fresh picked organic strawberry from a field--taste? It has the following rasas--sweet, astringent, a little sour--and it is juicy and full of PRANA and vitality.

Try to taste the same organic strawberry after freezing it for one month. You will notice that all the beautiful rasas or tastes have disappeared and there is practically no prana. (You can taste it!!)

How can a frozen strawberry have the same energetics as a frozen one? (Even if organic). Answer is no--it cant. If it is not how nature intended, and, it tastes different--how can prana be intact.

Take an example of a squirrel that died in winter--and it snowed.

The squirrel's body was perfectly preserved along with nutrients, proteins in the very cold snow for the entire winter. When the snow melted--squirrel was PRESERVED--but it was a DEAD BODY!!!!

Frozen, canned, tinned---is food that has died. It is dead. It has no prana from an Ayurvedic perpsective...yes, it has nutrients-some of it.

If something organic is frozen--yes the nutrients are preserved--but PRANA is not! However, when it is sun dried

Some of the prana is preserved--because seeds retain prana when dried. (Strawberry has seeds on the outside that will be preserve prana when sundried--but when frozen may not)

There are some seeds that will retain prana when frozen--but they are few and far in between.

It is always better to eat something local--even if not organic--then organic, frozen that has travelled from a long time.

However, we are bound by time, convenience, cost and availability depending on where we live.

1. Best foods that retain prana and therepeutic and healing to body and mind are

LOCAL, ORGANIC, NON GMO

2. Second best--foods that can be stored--in winter in very cold places.

Sundried organic foods, organic seeds, organic nuts, legumes. Whole grains (not ground into a flour) can stay for a longer time and will retain maximum prana.

3. Third best.

Better to eat fresh food, plants, veggies and fruits that are not organic, but LOCAL--compared to fresh food that is frozen and organic. Or, local dried fruits and vegetables--can be used in soups--if fresh vegetables not available.

4. Best choice

Mix and match--depending on your budget and availability.

More to come on...GMO FOODS and Ayurveda.

If you have any questions feel free to post it on our Facebook Page SDCOA

https://www.facebook.com/AyurvedaYogaTraining

Yoga and Ayurveda Compared

Yoga and Ayurveda Compared

Julie Neiman

(Track B- Level 1 Student)

Ayurveda is a holistic health modality which originated in Indian and has been practiced for thousands of years. The goal of Ayurveda is to maintain an optimal healthy balance in the mind and body, according to each individual’s unique constitution, or inherent nature. The word Ayurveda is made up of two Sanskrit words: “Ayu” meaning “life” and “Veda” meaning “knowledge”.

I had my first experience with Ayurveda when I was in the middle of my 200 hour Yoga teacher training. It was October, and my studio was organizing a fall Ayurveda cleanse, which lasted for one week. It was at this time that my yoga practice changed dramatically. Yoga and Ayurveda are often referred to as “sister sciences” as their teachings go hand in hand, complementing one another. From my personal experience I will say that yoga introduced me to Ayurveda, and Ayurveda took my yoga practice to a completely new level.

Not surprisingly, there are many similarities between Ayurveda and Yoga, as the two are deeply rooted in various ancient Indian philosophies and texts, and are created from many of the same, or similar, concepts.

Yoga, like Ayurveda, is a way of life; both philosophies have the potential to become integrated into many aspects of the practitioner’s daily routine, as they focus on caring for the whole, multi-dimensional person. They both acknowledge the five sheaths of being, or the five koshas. It is understood that each of the five koshas (physical body, energetic body, mental body, intellectual body, and spiritual body) must be in balance for a person to be considered truly healthy. Caring for all sheaths of being means that instead of just focusing on the body, as we commonly do in Western culture, the mind and spirit must also be nurtured equally in order to achieve this optimal health and wellbeing.

Additionally, Ayurveda uses many concepts from the Yogic eight-limbed path (the guideline for Ashtanga Yoga, outlined in the Yoga Sutras) in order to balance the body and the mind. These concepts include: asana (physical practice), pranayama (breath work), pratyahara (sensory control), dharana (concentration), and dhyana (meditation). The Yogic yamas (external ethical disciplines) and niyamas (internal ethical observances) relate to the Ayurvedic concepts of Hit-ayu (righteous living), and karma, respectively. Furthermore, the ultimate goal of both philosophies is spiritual liberation, which is Moksa in Ayurveda, and Samadhi in Yoga.

Both Yoga and Ayurveda work to prevent disease and injury by creating an optimal, harmonious balance within the body. There are specific Yoga asanas, or poses, that help to balance the three Ayurvedic doshas (Vata, Pitta, and Kapha). Meanwhile, when the doshas are balanced, the practitioner is able to delve even deeper into their personal Yogic journey, as a body free of disease and imbalance is more receptive to a deeper spiritual experience.

The focus on achieving individual balance, rather than striving toward a specific, pre-defined outcome, means that both Yoga and Ayurveda are relevant to all people, and not just those with a certain body type or particular condition. Each practice encourages individuals to connect in with their own deeper self to identify what they truly need to heal and improve their own personal situation.

In summary, Yoga and Ayurveda are both ancient Indian philosophies of self-care, which focus on optimizing and maintaining total health on an individual level. Each philosophy is incredibly effective when practiced on its own, and even more astonishing when practiced together.

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